Igorrr

Savage Sinusoid

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French musician Gautier Serre (aka Igorrr) titled one of his releases Baroquecore, and while his work does include mutilated breakbeats and majestic harpsichord played at jackhammer speed, those are only a fraction of the elements incorporated into his impossibly complex and eclectic compositions. He finds common ground between the intensity of metal and opera, with impassioned screaming, bludgeoning grindcore blast beats, and jagged guitar riffs coexisting with graceful arias. There's also a significant amount of acoustic instrumentation drawn from various Eastern European musical traditions, including ravishing violin, festive horns, and jaunty accordions, as well as Balkan choral vocals. Serre acknowledges Gypsy ensemble Taraf de Haïdouks as an influence, along with Cannibal Corpse and Aphex Twin, among many others. Following several releases for breakcore labels like Ad Noiseam (which sadly folded at the end of 2015), Savage Sinusoid is his debut for Metal Blade, the powerhouse that introduced Metallica and Slayer to the world. Over a dozen guest musicians and singers contribute their talents, including members of Mayhem, Cattle Decapitation, Secret Chiefs 3, and Pryapisme, as well as operatic vocalists Laurent Lunoir and Laure Le Prunenec. Serre's fusion of acoustic and electronic instruments is tighter and more refined than ever, and while Savage Sinusoid sounds unmistakably like an Igorrr album, he hasn't come close to sounding predictable yet. "Houmous" is a clear highlight, combining klezmer with topsy-turvy breakbeats, funk bass, chiptune blips, and a brief cameo from Serre's pet chicken! "Problème d'Émotion" is more subdued, beginning with glacial, Satie-esque piano before a heavy, growling beat thwacks its way in, and "Spaghetti Forever" finds space for gentle classical guitar and even a splash of surf guitar along with its shredded operatic vocals, frenzied screams, and harsh breaks. Serre has continually outdone himself with each successive Igorrr release, and this is no different -- it's even more exciting and confounding than 2012's Hallelujah (which included many of the same musicians) and 2014's Maigre EP (with Ruby My Dear).

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