PFM

Passpartu

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    4
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AllMusic Review by

PFM represented the angle of progressive rock that incorporated a classical approach into the core of the music. Their heavy utilization of strings and woodwind instruments began to prevail into the group's later albums, leaving behind the more aggressive side of prog rock more and more with each release throughout the 1970s. Sometimes this lighter sound was sturdy and collective, but other attempts at this form of instrumentation came off as weak and watered down. Passpartu is a good example of the latter, as dabs of piano and synthesizer can be appreciated on their own but cease to gel as one uniform sound throughout the length of the album. Almost encompassing a pop feel, PFM sound unusually over the top in some places which hinders the progressive uniformity that comprised their sound on sturdier albums. Unlike Photos of Ghosts or The World Became the World, Passpartu is set afloat on the overbearing airiness of the melodies and never regains a reinforced structure from start to finish. Combining the free-spirited sounds of flute and violin become more effective when there's an even balance of percussion to level them out, which is what this album lacks. This album seems fitting for one of Venice's outdoor cafes, since it doesn't resemble the assertiveness that PFM has shown earlier in their career, and could have been rescued by even the slightest addition of instrumental weight.

Track Listing

Title/Composer Performer Time Stream
1
PFM
4:34 Amazon
2
PFM
3:25 Amazon
3
PFM
4:40 Amazon
4
PFM
4:53 Amazon
5
PFM
4:51 Amazon
6
PFM
5:21 Amazon
7
PFM
4:52 Amazon
8
PFM
4:10 Amazon
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