Muddy Waters

First Recording Sessions 1941-1946

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The landmark sides which comprise Muddy Waters' First Recording Sessions trace the early evolution of one of the blues' most enduring greats, offering invaluable insight into the primal influences which helped shape his musical identity. The profound influence of Waters' idol Son House is most indelibly etched into these early sides, with the bottleneck guitar sound on the first cuts "Country Blues" and "I Be's Troubled" -- both recorded by Alan Lomax in 1941 -- a prime example of the Mississippi blues style of the period. When Lomax returned a year later, he recorded Waters in a string band also including violinist Son Simms, guitarist Percy Thomas and mandolinist Louis Ford; among the tracks they cut is "Take a Walk with Me," in all likelihood inspired by Robert Lockwood. By the final group of songs, dating from 1946, Waters was in Chicago, and here his guitar style began to move toward his future trademark sound, which is most in evidence on the classic closer, the two-part "Rollin' and Tumblin."

Track Listing

Sample Title/Composer Performer Time
1 3:24
2 3:00
3
feat: Son Simms
3:14
4
feat: Son Simms
2:58
5
feat: Son Simms
2:43
6
feat: Son Simms
3:21
7 2:55
8 3:10
9 3:16
10 3:14
11 2:05
12 2:05
13 3:32
14 2:20
15
feat: Homer Harris
2:50
16
feat: Homer Harris
2:30
17
3:00
18 2:49
19 2:44
20 2:42
21
feat: James Clark
2:47
22
feat: James Clark
2:52
23
feat: Leroy Foster
2:53
24
feat: Leroy Foster
2:44
blue highlight denotes track pick