Rinaldo Alessandrini / Concerto Italiano

Marenzio: Madrigali

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Italian Renaissance composer Luca Marenzio was internationally recognized as the leading composer of madrigals at the height of his career, in the last two decades of the 16th century. He was so popular (and the sales of his music so lucrative) that within years of his death, both Flemish and German publishers had issued volumes of his complete five- and six-part madrigals, an honor almost unheard of at the time. Marenzio's madrigals, while anticipating the songlike lyricism of monody that would come to dominate vocal music of the early Baroque, made full use of the textural and expressive qualities of Renaissance polyphony. His music was not quite as adventurous as Gesualdo's, but it still pushed at the harmonic conventions of the time in order to draw out the emotion of the texts with the maximum expressivity. Palestrina, the paragon of polyphonic correctness, is known to have despised Marenzio for placing expressive content above the rules of proper counterpoint.

Marenzio wrote over 400 madrigals, and this collection includes a sampling of 28, written during the composer's most fruitful period, between 1580 and his death in 1599. Five- and six-part madrigals are represented, some a cappella and some accompanied, and there are several instrumental arrangements of the works made by composers of Marenzio's generation. Using texts by a variety of poets, they are remarkable for the emotional depth and inventiveness of the text setting, the sure handling of harmonies that are sometimes vertiginously chromatic, and their expressive range. The majority are melancholy meditations on lost love, but Marenzio finds infinite ways to express anguished intensity. Rinaldo Alessandrini leads six singers and a small instrumental ensemble of Concerto Italiano in impassioned performances. The singers have distinctive, lovely voices, and each sings with warmth and transparent expressiveness, but at the same time, their blend is gorgeously rich and smooth, an ideal combination for these madrigals. Opus 111's sound is immaculate and wonderfully present. The CD should be of strong interest to fans of Renaissance vocal music and superlative ensemble singing.

Track Listing

Sample Title/Composer Performer Time
1
2:02
2
2:00
3
4:38
4
1:28
5
2:17
6
2:20
7
3:21
8
1:41
9
3:07
10
2:02
11
4:33
12
2:02
13
3:11
14
1:36
Tirsi morir volea, madrigal for 5 voices (Il primo libro de madrigali a 5 voci)
15
2:31
16
2:26
17
1:19
18
7:02
19
2:31
20
3:06
Caro Aminta pur vuoi, madrigal for 6 voices (Il quarto libro de madrigali a 6 voci)
21
1:59
22
2:29
Cruda Amarilli che co 'l nom'ancora, madrigal for 5 voices (Il settimo libro de madrigali a 5 voci)
23
2:17
24
3:11
25
1:37
Così nel mio parlar voglio esser aspro, madrigal for 5 voices (Il nono libro de madrigali a 5 voci)
26
3:46
27
2:54
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