Fabrizio De André

Effedia: Sulla Mia Cattiva Strada

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Predictably, Fabrizio De André's untimely death in 1999 only exponentially increased his reputation as Italy's finest and most influential songwriter bar none, and several compilation and posthumous releases followed. These are of varying degrees of interest (intended for a massive audience, for collectors, etc.), but none is truly essential in the way that any of De André's extraordinary studio albums are. The last in line, Effedia: Sulla Mia Cattiva Strada, is actually the soundtrack to a 2008 documentary by Teresa Marchesi. This package thus includes 34 De André songs sprayed over two CDs, as well as a DVD featuring the documentary film. Clearly, the film constitutes the main attraction, as it contains many interviews, home videos, and other rare footage, made possible thanks to De André's companion, Dori Guezzi, who actively collaborated with the filmmaker. Since De André was a famous recluse who seldom made any public appearances, the film is simply invaluable. The audio, however, is a different matter. Songs are not in chronological order, mixing classic recordings, live versions, and a few previously unavailable tracks, from all periods of De André's wide-ranging discography. Every song is fantastic, but that is hardly a surprise or an achievement considering De André's monolithic consistency -- you could conceivable let a monkey pick the selections and the results would be equally impressive. The problem is the same with all De André's compilations: the man was the archetypal album artist and several of his masterpieces are concept albums. Listening to his songs out of context, or even out of sequence, diminishes their aesthetic and historical appeal. Thus, the value of all new De André's compilations ultimately lies with the snippets of rare material that surface each time. Effedia: Sulla Mia Cattiva Strada includes two previously released duets with Mina and Roberto Murolo, a throwaway version of the Mexican traditional "Cielito Lindo" from a 1993 TV show, and three very early recordings from 1959, when De André was an amateur singer. Although hardly essential, these are by far the most interesting of the novelties, a rare and moving chance to hear a very young De André take on two Italian folk songs, "Bella Se Vuoi Volare" and "Maria Giuana," plus a third, "Dai Monti della Savoia," written in the same popular vein and attributed to De André himself.

Track Listing - Disc 1

Title/Composer Performer Time Stream
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
Amazon
8
9
feat: Mina
Amazon
10
Amazon
11
feat: Mina
12
Amazon
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
feat: Dori Ghezzi
25
26
feat: Mia Martini
27
28
29
30
feat: Luigi Tenco
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
feat: Fiorello
38
39
feat: Vasco Rossi
40
41
42
blue highlight denotes track pick