Valerie Jones

Biography by

Responsible not only for singing but for writing soul music golden oldies such as "Your Love Goes Stronger," Valerie Jones had a reputation for being the least outgoing of three Detroit sisters who performed…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Responsible not only for singing but for writing soul music golden oldies such as "Your Love Goes Stronger," Valerie Jones had a reputation for being the least outgoing of three Detroit sisters who performed together as the Jones Girls. Indeed, despite or maybe because of the amount of time she spent in recording studios, this Jones tried to stay on her college track as a business major. With older sisters Brenda Jones and Shirley Jones, no relation to the Partridge Family mama, the group not only recorded four albums on its own for the Philadelphia International label but also provided background vocals for many Motown artists.

The Jones Girls were hits in the discos that were all the rage in the late '70s with songs such as "You Gonna Make Me Love Somebody Else" and "Nights Over Egypt." They had originally been trained to sing in churches under guidance from their mother, a professional gospel singer named Mary Frazier Jones, who apparently was one of the first artists in the gospel genre to be recorded by RCA. Associates of the mother have recalled the girls being put to use as harmony singers when they were quite little, and being very good at it. Manager Dick Scott developed an interest in the sisters after they switched over to secular music, and the trio began performing as an opener for Detroit stars such as the Four Tops. Diana Ross eventually provided larger exposure for the group by giving the sisters a featured portion within her own stage show. Between the late '70s and early '80s the group scored its string of hits before finally fizzling out into a combination of early retirement and solo careers. In the late '90s a resurgence of interest in the Philly soul sound was the motivation for getting the Jones Girls back in action.

Valerie Jones died in Detroit on December 2, 2001, at the age of 45.