The Enemys

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The Enemys are best remembered as a group fronted by Cory Wells before he joined up with Danny Hutton and Chuck Negron to form Three Dog Night. They were a fairly successful Los Angeles-based garage band…
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The Enemys are best remembered as a group fronted by Cory Wells before he joined up with Danny Hutton and Chuck Negron to form Three Dog Night. They were a fairly successful Los Angeles-based garage band who cut a quartet of singles on two different labels between 1965 and 1967 and enjoyed a pair of minor hits. The group started out on the East Coast as the Vibratos, whose membership included Wells on vocals, Mike Luston on guitar, and Dave Treiger on drums. According to a biographical article by Wells, they were persuaded to head to California in early 1965 by Luston's manager/brother-in-law, and hit Los Angeles in the heyday of the post-Beatles era, just as the Byrds -- then playing at Ciro's -- were about to burst on the national scene, and Sonny Bono and his young wife Cher were still working under one of their early aliases. Recruiting a fourth member, Cal Titus, on bass, they worked out a repertory that ran the gamut from bluesy rock & roll to surf music, including some room for Beatles tunes. They also changed their name to the Enemys and got their first regular gig at a club called the Rag Doll. The quartet cut their first single, "Sinner Man" (as Cory Wells & the Enemys) in the late winter of 1965 for the Valiant label, which became a minor hit. Later that same year, they released "Glitter and Gold" b/w "Too Much Monkey Business" on MGM, which failed to chart. The Enemys also attracted the attention of television producers and began showing up on the small screen in 1965 as well, in episodes of series such as The Beverly Hillbillies ("Hoe Down A-Go-Go") and Burke's Law ("Who Killed the Strangler") -- the former, shown in the fall of 1965, had them miming to an ersatz garage band blues cover titled "Mojo Woman," which they later released as a single on MGM. They subsequently had another minor hit with their rendition of "Hey Joe," and made the rounds of clubs all over Los Angeles before becoming the house band at the Whiskey-a-Go-Go. Amid all of the performances, the Enemys also contributed to a pair of feature films, the exploitation drama Riot On Sunset Strip and the Paul Newman-starring detective thriller Harper. Wells was later asked by Cher to go on tour with Sonny & Cher, and it was there that he first met Danny Hutton, striking up a friendship that would lead to the founding of Three Dog Night. The Enemys broke up in 1967 when Wells left Los Angeles for an extended hiatus in Arizona.