The Coleman Brothers

This spiritual/jubilee vocal group from Newark, New Jersey, USA, comprised brothers Lander (lead, first tenor), Russell (first tenor), Wallace (baritone), Melvin (bass) and Everitte Coleman (guitar),…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography

This spiritual/jubilee vocal group from Newark, New Jersey, USA, comprised brothers Lander (lead, first tenor), Russell (first tenor), Wallace (baritone), Melvin (bass) and Everitte Coleman (guitar), plus Danny Owens (tenor). The Coleman Brothers were one of the most renowned groups in the 40s performing in the light spiritual or jubilee style. They came from a musical family and prior to the formation of the group in 1925, there had been an earlier Coleman Brothers line-up from 1918-26 that played in churches and meeting halls throughout New Jersey. The membership of the new Coleman Brothers group was, in its early days, constantly in flux and did not crystallize until the mid-30s. The group toured the south and made many appearances on radio before signing their first recording contract, with Decca Records, in 1944. Their first record, ‘Low Down Chariot’, launched a series of successful singles - notably ‘His Eye Is On The Sparrow’, ‘New Milky White Way’ and ‘Sending Up My Timber’ - in the marketplace for Decca as well as for Manor and for their own Coleman label. The group continued to make its presence felt in radio, performing as a staff vocal group for CBS Records in 1945 and from 1946-48 working at WLW in Cincinnati. In 1945, Melvin left the group and was replaced with A.J. Eldridge, but by 1951 the Coleman Brothers had disbanded. Lander Coleman re-formed the Coleman Brothers in 1964 with second tenor John Bryant, baritone Fred Perry and bass A.J. Eldridge. They made an album for Savoy, Milky White Way, and continued as a group until disbanding in 1977. Lander Coleman pursued a solo career and recorded a number of albums for his own label, Golden Records.