Reggae George

b. George Daley, c.1950, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. With Neville Beckford, Daley would attend auditions as one half of the duo Neville and George. His partner went on to record in the DJ style as…
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Artist Biography

b. George Daley, c.1950, Kingston, Jamaica, West Indies. With Neville Beckford, Daley would attend auditions as one half of the duo Neville and George. His partner went on to record in the DJ style as Jah Woosh, while George recorded ‘Babylon Kingdom Fall’ as Prince George - an alias he used only once. His second release, ‘Fig Root’, credited to Reggae George, was produced by Sonia Pottinger for her High Note label. The success of ‘Fig Root’ led to recording sessions with producer Hartnell Henry, featuring Bingi Bunny and Sowell Radics, who later formed part of the Roots Radics session band. The most notable release was ‘Read The Bible’, which was followed by ‘Vision’, ‘Stop Push The Fire’ and a version of the classic Dennis Walks hit, ‘Drifter’. The big break came with producer Winston ‘Niney’ Holness and the release of ‘Trodding’, which achieved international acclaim and an appearance in the reggae chart. ‘Three Wicked Men’ followed for 56 Hope Road, an offshoot label of Bob Marley’s Tuff Gong empire. It was in the studio that gave the label its name that Rita Marley engineered the recording, ably assisted by Sylvan Morris who had worked on much of Marley’s output, notably Rastaman Vibration. With such an impressive track record Trojan were keen to release Mix Up, which included the hit ‘Stop Push The Fire’, alongside ‘No Fuss Nor Fight’, ‘Sister Dawn’, ‘Gimme Gimme Your Love’ and a version of John Holt’s ‘My Eyes’. The set was produced by Prince Far I and musicians on the set included Jah Lloyd, Sowell Radics, Errol Holt and Professor Larry. Despite critical acclaim and the obvious pedigree, Mix Up made little impression on the album charts. In 1983 his Tuff Gong recordings surfaced on Dennis Brown’s Yvonne’s Special label in the UK, while Greensleeves Records released ‘Walla Walla’ and the more popular ‘You’ll Never Know’/‘We Still Survive’. A follow-up to Mix Up was scheduled, but owing to the untimely death of Prince Far I, the project was abandoned. By the mid-80s, reunited with his old friend Neville Beckford and employing a host of the island’s top session men, he released Fight On My Own.