Pidgeon

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Pidgeon's only album, 1969's self-titled Pidgeon, would be even more obscure than it is were it not for the presence of Jobriath (here credited as Jobriath Salisbury) as principal singer, co-songwriter,…
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Pidgeon's only album, 1969's self-titled Pidgeon, would be even more obscure than it is were it not for the presence of Jobriath (here credited as Jobriath Salisbury) as principal singer, co-songwriter, keyboardist, and guitarist, about five years before he emerged as a notorious glam rocker whose hype failed to deliver commercial results. In mid-1968, he left the Los Angeles cast of the Hair musical to hook up with Pidgeon, whose material was co-written by Jobriath and lyricist Richard T. Marshall. Producer and session singer Stan Farber got them a contract with Decca Records, and arranged for them to rehearse for six months in a house before they entered the studio to record Pidgeon in late 1968. Containing elements of California sunshine pop, the harmonies of the Mamas & the Papas, the baroque pop of the Left Banke, and a little heavier psychedelia à la Jefferson Airplane, the Pidgeon album was too confused to cohere into a satisfying whole, though Jobriath's high and strident vocals were a big part of the mix. Pidgeon released a subsequent non-LP single in 1969, "Rubber Bricks"/"Prison Walls," before breaking up.