Philip Braham

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British composer Philip Braham is best remembered for the jazz standard "Limehouse Blues," which has been recorded by countless artists over the years. Born in 1881, Braham started composing for British…
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British composer Philip Braham is best remembered for the jazz standard "Limehouse Blues," which has been recorded by countless artists over the years. Born in 1881, Braham started composing for British theatrical revues in the 1910s, many produced by Andre Charlot. In some of his earliest efforts, Braham contributed additional music to Theodore & Co. and See-Saw in 1916. 1918's Tails Up found him working with lyricists Hugh E. Wright and Douglas Furber; for 1921's A to Z, he teamed with lyricists Ronald Jeans and Dion Titheradge. His most productive partnership, however, was with Douglas Furber, with whom he co-wrote "Now That I've Found You" and, most notably, 1922's "Limehouse Blues." "Limehouse Blues" was debuted in Andre Charlot's Revue of 1924 by Noel Coward associate Gertrude Lawrence, en route to becoming a jazz staple. In 1925, Braham contributed music to one of Coward's earlier stage efforts, On With the Dance; the same year, he teamed up with John Hastings Turner to write Bubbly. Other lyricists Braham worked with included Eric Blore, Reginald Douglas Brownsmith, and Anthony Lowry. In the early '30s, Braham moved into motion pictures, serving as the musical director at Wembley Studios for several films. However, his career was cut short by his premature death in 1934.