Paul Warmack & His Gully Jumpers

One of the Grand Ole Opry’s first string bands, it comprised Paul Warmack (b. 16 August 1889, Whites Creek, Tennessee, USA, d. 2 July 1954; mandolin, guitar, vocals), Charlie Arrington (b. 1893, d,…
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Artist Biography

One of the Grand Ole Opry’s first string bands, it comprised Paul Warmack (b. 16 August 1889, Whites Creek, Tennessee, USA, d. 2 July 1954; mandolin, guitar, vocals), Charlie Arrington (b. 1893, d, date unknown; fiddle), Roy Hardison (b. William Roy Hardison, 19 July 1896, Maury County, Tennessee, USA, d. 11 February 1966; banjo) and Burt Hutcherson (b. 1894, d. 10 July 1980; guitar). Warmack ran his own car repair business, Hardison was a garage foremen, Arrington a farmer and Hutcherson a woodworker. Hardison occasionally played with other groups and prior to joining Warmack and Hutcherson had previously played with Dr. Humphrey Bate’s Possum Hunters. Apart from their Saturday night spot, Warmack and Hutcherson also broadcast an early-morning WSM show as the Early Birds. In October 1928, when the Victor Company decided to record some of the early Opry acts, the Gully Jumpers became one of the first bands to record in Nashville (Victor actually recorded 69 sides but only 36 were issued). The first record issued by Victor, which therefore had the distinction of being the first commercially released Nashville recording by a major label, was Paul Warmack And The Gully Jumpers’ ‘Tennessee Waltz’ (not the popular Pee Wee King / Redd Stewart composition) and ‘The Little Red Caboose Behind The Train’ (Victor V-40067). The band also recorded four instrumentals but only two, ‘Robertson County’ and ‘Stone Rag’, were released and they made no further recordings. The Gully Jumpers remained with the Opry for 20 years until, following the death of some members of various Opry bands, the management effected mergers of the remaining musicians. Hutcherson taught guitar in Nashville for many years.