Miguel Gustavo

Biography by

Miguel Gustavo, a good-humored critic of Carioca customs, had success with the sambas and marchas de Carnaval "Café Soçaite" (1955), "Fanzoca de Rádio" (1958), "E daí" (1959), and "Brigitte Bardot"…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Miguel Gustavo, a good-humored critic of Carioca customs, had success with the sambas and marchas de Carnaval "Café Soçaite" (1955), "Fanzoca de Rádio" (1958), "E daí" (1959), and "Brigitte Bardot" (1961). In the '60s, Gustavo created a series of sambas de breque that were a success in Moreira da Silva's renditions, when the interpreter became known as Kid Morengueira. Those sambas, of which the most popular was "O Rei do Gatilho" (1962), narrated imaginary films portraying satirical situations mixing elements of Far West, Mafia, and favela disputes. At 19, Miguel Gustavo left his studies to be a DJ at Rádio Vera Cruz. In the '50s, he started to write jingles, a characteristic that would be conspicuous in his subsequent production of sambas and marchas. In 1952, he wrote the valse "Vovozinha" (with Edmundo Souto/Juanita Castilho), but the first hit would come three years later with "Café Soçaite," recorded by Jorge Veiga. The same interpreter included several compositions by Gustavo on his 1956 LP, Boate Tralalá, including the title-track. In 1958, Gustavo wrote the march "Fanzoca de Rádio," recorded by Carequinha, which was the most popular song at that year's Carnaval. The march satirized the behavior of the masses, mesmerized by the icons cited (Emilinha Borba, Cauby Peixoto, César de Alencar). In 1959, Gustavo had success with "E daí," recorded by Elizeth Cardoso. Two years later, Luiz Vanderley recorded his "Brigitte Bardot." In the '60s, Gustavo wrote some sambas de breque that brought Moreira da Silva back to the public eye and created the character Kid Morengueira, incorporated by Moreira as his alter ego. In 1970, Miguel Gustavo had his biggest hit with the jingle "Pra Frente, Brasil." Ordered by a beer company for the World Cup that year (when Brazil won the world championship for the third consecutive time, conquering definitively the Jules Rimet cup), the jingle was appropriated by the military dictatorship as an excellent vehicle for political propaganda, withdrawing everyone's mind from the serious situation with the popularity soccer enjoys in Brazil. Also in the '70s, Miguel Gustavo also wrote jingles such as "Plante Que O Governo Garante" for the Department of Agriculture.