Jimmy Crawford

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"I Love How You Love Me" was a British chart hit around the same time as "Take 5" by Dave Brubeck, meaning circa 1961. Although the original version of the song was cut the same year by the Paris Sisters…
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"I Love How You Love Me" was a British chart hit around the same time as "Take 5" by Dave Brubeck, meaning circa 1961. Although the original version of the song was cut the same year by the Paris Sisters in an early Phil Spector production, the version that is remembered the most by the oldies crowd is the recording by Jimmy Crawford. This wasn't the end of the line for this song, either, as will be seen later. The British Jimmy Crawford might get confused with either the American swing jazz drummer or country & western pedal steel player of the same name. Either of these namesakes easily drown him out in terms of the number of records they have released or their importance in musical history. The British Crawford is mostly remembered in his hometown of Sheffield, a lovely Peak district locale that has produced as much British pop talent as it has unexplained stone circles. Def Leppard, Dave Berry, Heaven 17, Mick Jones, and Joe Cocker all hail from the same region, so there must be something in the water. His hit was remade in 1968 by Bobby Vinton, one of a group of earlier records by singers Vinton considered his rivals that he created souped-up versions of. Vinton's "I Love How You Love Me" had great chart success. In the early '70s, Bryan Ferry released his take on the song as part of his romantic These Foolish Things album. Ferry's "I Love How You Love Me" was released as a single in France in 1973. Ferry's album has gotten the best reviews of any version of the song, but the Sheffield lad has won the battle of the hearts, apparently. Crawford's version of this song is the one used on a slew of compilations with romantic themes. Various online wedding and romantic messaging companies also offer the Crawford version of "I Love How You Love Me" for use as an ultra-romantic cyber-greeting. Crawford himself is seen and heard performing the blues number "Take It Easy" in the 1962 low-budget mod-rocker film entitled Play It Cool. The behind-the-scenes adventures making this film seem to be of much more interest than the cinematic end product, despite it being directed by none other than Michael Winner, years before he became a big cheese in Hollywood. Crawford was accompanied in his number by the group of Lionel Blair & His Dancers, the dancers of course indulging in mod grooving. One of these dancers recalled in a later interview that the director so annoyed everyone by blaring out his orders through a megaphone that on one of the last days of shooting, someone dusted cocaine onto the area of the megaphone that Winner's nose and lips would come in contact with. A British guitarist also named Jimmy Crawford shows up on late '60s recordings by saxophonist and bandleader Johnny Almond, but this is most likely not the same individual.