Jeremy Harding

b. Jamaica, West Indies. Harding was educated in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he studied for a degree in music production. His gained his initial experience producing local R&B and hip-hop acts while…
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Artist Biography

b. Jamaica, West Indies. Harding was educated in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, where he studied for a degree in music production. His gained his initial experience producing local R&B and hip-hop acts while still in Canada. By 1993 he had returned to Jamaica where he set up a small studio in his apartment. Harding first gained notoriety supported by his brother Zachary of the Syndicate sound system, and his association with the Syndicate sound led to productions for the notable Renaissance sound that resulted in Harding producing dub plate specials with artists such as, Don Yute, Buccaneer, Goofy, Spragga Benz, Capleton, and the Monster Shack Crew. Harding subsequently recruited up-and-coming artists including Roundhead and General B, to perform on his ‘Fearless’ rhythm. He also recorded the Scare Dem Crew (‘Mi Nuh Fight Over Gal’), and Sean Paul (‘Baby Girl’) on the same rhythm. Unfortunately, although the tunes proved popular Harding was unable to reap the rewards of his first success and returned to his most lucrative line of work, producing commercial jingles. In 1997, however, Harding enjoyed artistic and financial success with the ‘Playground’ rhythm, which spawned Beenie Man’s transatlantic crossover hit ‘Who Am I’. The song was originally released on Harding’s 2 Hard label in Jamaica before being licensed to VP in the USA and Greensleeves Records in the UK. The song also provided the foundation to ‘Nike Air’, one of the debut hits for Mr. Vegas, as well as established performers such as Merciless and Mad Cobra. In 1998, Harding was acknowledged as giving banker turned DJ, Sean Paul his international break with the hit, ‘Infiltrate’. The song became popular with hip-hop supporters and led to a successful collaboration with DMX on the Belly soundtrack. In 2000, Harding returned with a vengeance, voicing a number of artists on his new rhythms, notably Elephant Man and Delly Ranks (‘Them Vex Now’).