Jack McCauley

b. John Bernard McCauley, 10 January 1900, New York, USA, d. 13 June 1980, Menlo Park, California, USA. As a child actor McCauley appeared in the silent films Hearts Of Men (1915) and The Valley Of Fear…
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Artist Biography

b. John Bernard McCauley, 10 January 1900, New York, USA, d. 13 June 1980, Menlo Park, California, USA. As a child actor McCauley appeared in the silent films Hearts Of Men (1915) and The Valley Of Fear (1916). On Broadway in the early 30s he was in the revue The Gang’s All Here (1931), which had only a 23-performance run at the Imperial Theatre. The book was by Frank McCoy, Russell Crouse and Oscar Hammerstein II, music composed by Lewis E. Gensler, lyrics by Owen Murphy and Robert A. Simon. The following year McCauley was in another revue, Hey Nonny Nonny! Later in the decade came the revue The Show Is On (1936), for which most of the songs were by Vernon Duke and Ted Fetter. In the 40s, McCauley was in the straight play Johnny On A Spot (1942), which had only four performances, and then was in the revues Ziegfeld Follies Of 1943, with Milton Berle and Ilona Massey, and Sing Out, Sweet Land (1944), which also featured Alfred Drake, Philip Coolidge, Juanita Hall, Burl Ives, Alma Kaye and Bibi Osterwald.

In the late 40s McCauley was in the long-running Phil Silvers vehicle High Button Shoes (1947), singing Jule Styne and Sammy Cahn’s ‘Get Away For A Day In The Country’ with Johnny Stewart, and, with Nanette Fabray, ‘Papa, Won’t You Dance With Me’ and ‘I Still Get Jealous’. His last major Broadway show was another big success, Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1949), in which he sang Styne and Leo Robin’s ‘Bye, Bye Baby’ and the title song with Carol Channing.