Glen Rowell

Biography by

Glenn Rowell, his first name appearing as "Glen" with a certain amount of regularity, was a member of two popular duos on radio. First, with Ford Rush, was Ford & Glen, also known as "Big"…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Glenn Rowell, his first name appearing as "Glen" with a certain amount of regularity, was a member of two popular duos on radio. First, with Ford Rush, was Ford & Glen, also known as "Big" Ford and "Little" Glen, as well as the Lullaby Boys, a duo that made its debut on Chicago's WLS in 1924. Rush was the first person to ever be employed by this broadcasting giant, property of the Sears company. Rowell signed on as studio director and eventually became head of the music department. But like many performers heard on radio in this early era of broadcasting, Ford and Glenn had to be excellent performers themselves, not just talking heads.

The duo released scads of 78s, many of which involved Rowell's talents as a composer as well. Collaborating with writers such as Dot Godfrey and George Graff, Rowell came up with titles such as "April Fool" and "Engine Love Call," the latter sure to be appealing to a partner who first name is Ford. Of a greater impact than the pair's recordings, however, was their influence in the radio industry itself. A heads-up from Ford and Glenn could easily mean a gig for an upcoming artist.

When the pair broke up in 1930, Rowell's next partner was vocalist, actor, announcer and fellow composer Gene Carroll. Gene and Glenn had many radio slots during the '30s, including three years on NBC, six nights a week. The duo broke up in 1943, the same year they published a ditty entitled "Seven Little Stars (And the Man in the Moon)." In the following decade Rowell displayed his keyboard abilities on an album of ragtime duets with Johnny Maddox; this appears to be his last recording of any note -- of lots of notes, actually, since that seems to be a requirement of the ragtime genre.