Geezer Lake

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One of North Carolina's less exposed indie outfits, Geezer Lake hailed not from the fertile Chapel Hill scene of the early '90s, but rather from nearby Greensboro. They enjoyed substantial local buzz,…
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One of North Carolina's less exposed indie outfits, Geezer Lake hailed not from the fertile Chapel Hill scene of the early '90s, but rather from nearby Greensboro. They enjoyed substantial local buzz, but were never quite able to translate it into a wider college radio audience. Somewhat heavy and metallic compared to the area's noisier guitar bands (Archers of Loaf, Polvo), Geezer Lake varied their jagged, angular sound with left-field trumpet melodies, samples, and intricate, jazzy rhythms. Initially a quartet, the band was composed of vocalist/trumpet player Chris Clodfelter, guitarist/tape manipulator Eric Shepherd, bassist Harrison Cannon, and drummer Scott Irving. Winning a strong following around Greensboro and Chapel Hill, the band formed its own D-Tox label and issued two 7" singles, "Field Blister" and "Liberated Woman." They also appeared on the North Carolina-themed Pyloric Waves compilation alongside Slowchange Madagascar, Chris Clodfelter's side project with brother Jim.

In 1993, Geezer Lake issued its debut full-length, Feet in Mud Again, also on their D-Tox imprint. After moving to Squealer for 1994's 7" EP Songs from the Watering Hole, they returned to D-Tox for their second album, 1995's Hearts Won't Try This. Meanwhile, the Clodfelter brothers began moonlighting as horn players for Barry Black, the mostly instrumental side project of Archers of Loaf frontman Eric Bachmann. Jim Clodfelter subsequently joined Geezer Lake as the second guitarist, expanding the group to a quintet for their final album, 1997's King Frost Parade, which was released by the Thick label. However, not long after, the members decided it was time to move on, and disbanded. Jazz-trained drummer Irving went on to work with Eugene Chadbourne, and founded his own solo venture, the Clang Quartet, which blended percussive free improvisation with electric instruments and Christianity-inspired sound collages.