Dick Cary

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Dick Cary, best-known for his stint with Louis Armstrong's All-Stars (1947-1948), was most significant as a behind-the-scenes arranger and freelance musician in the trad jazz movement. He made his recording…
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Dick Cary, best-known for his stint with Louis Armstrong's All-Stars (1947-1948), was most significant as a behind-the-scenes arranger and freelance musician in the trad jazz movement. He made his recording debut with Joe Marsala (1942), worked as a soloist at Nick's (1942-1943), and played for short periods with the Casa Loma Orchestra and Brad Gowans. While in the Army (1944-1946), he was able to keep on recording, including with Muggsy Spanier and Wild Bill Davison. After playing with Billy Butterfield and Louis Armstrong, Cary was with Jimmy Dorsey's big band (1949-1950); wrote arrangements and played alto horn on Eddie Condon's television shows; and throughout the 1950s, played and wrote for the Condon gang, recording with Condon, Pee Wee Russell, Max Kaminsky, Bud Freeman, Jimmy McPartland, Bobby Hackett, and others. In 1959, he settled in Los Angeles, working as a freelance musician up until his death. In later years, Cary led his Tuesday Night Friends band and performed often at Dixieland jazz festivals.