Clive "Azul" Hunt

b. May 1952, Linstead, St. Catherine, Jamaica, West Indies. Hunt originally trained as a tailor and learnt to play the trumpet while at school. At the age of 17 he joined the Jamaican Military Band, where…
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Artist Biography

b. May 1952, Linstead, St. Catherine, Jamaica, West Indies. Hunt originally trained as a tailor and learnt to play the trumpet while at school. At the age of 17 he joined the Jamaican Military Band, where he honed his trumpeting skills. He was initially recruited by Byron Lee as part of the Dragonaires and joined them on their tour of North America. On his return, Hunt became involved in playing on a number of sessions in Jamaica, including Culture’s Combolo, which was produced by Sonia Pottinger at the reactivated Treasure Isle Studios in Bond Street. In the latter half of the 70s Hunt emigrated to New York, USA, where he teamed up with Chalice and co-wrote the hit for Joe Gibbs, ‘Good To Be There’, although there was subsequently some dispute regarding the origins of the song. Hunt’s association with Gibbs also resulted in the composition ‘Milk And Honey’ for Dennis Brown; Hunt played trumpet on the sessions for Brown’s Spellbound and co-produced his 1981 A&M Records debut, Foul Play. Hunt then began working with Wackies, where he played on sessions and performed as a soloist, recording ‘Rockfort Rock’ as Clive ‘Azul’ Hunt. He remained a US citizen until 1987 but then returned to Jamaica, where his career as a producer and arranger flourished. He produced a number of singles with Beres Hammond, including the perennial ‘Putting Up Resistance’. Hunt’s reputation grew and he worked on the internationally successful ‘I Can See Clearly Now’ for Jimmy Cliff, the Steely And Clevie remake of ‘You Don’t Love Me (No, No, No)’ for Dawn Penn, and was employed by veteran rockers the Rolling Stones. In 1994 Hunt co-produced Judy Mowatt’s Life on her own Judy M label, later released by Pow Wow as Rock Me. Much of Hunt’s production work was based at Bob Marley’s Tuff Gong studio where he worked with the Abyssinians remaking their classic hits, and also with Tyrone Taylor, the I-Threes, Yvad, Richie Spice and Garnett Silk. In the new millennium much of Hunt’s work was revisited through Trojan Records’ revival programme.