Bobby Moore

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Listeners -- perhaps dancers and disc jockeys might be a more specific grouping -- might not remember who Bobby Moore was. That, in fact, is a given; otherwise, the saxophonist and bandleader of the same…
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Listeners -- perhaps dancers and disc jockeys might be a more specific grouping -- might not remember who Bobby Moore was. That, in fact, is a given; otherwise, the saxophonist and bandleader of the same name wouldn't have to explain in interviews with magazines such as Soul Express that he is not the Bobby Moore who put out a couple of literally big singles for the Scepter label in the mid-'70s. The most famous one of these titles is "(Call Me Your) Anything Man," a pitch for identity transfer if there ever was one. Famous it is, though, even if the Bobby Moore who sang it apparently was not.

Fame does not always go hand in hand with amplitude, but in this case the importance of Moore was literally judged in terms of more, as in larger. These records were bigger than anything disc jockeys had seen before in terms of a single. "(Call Me Your) Anything Man" is considered the first 12" single release, an innovative move for Scepter honcho Mel Cheren that had immediate repercussions on the dancefloor as well as in earplug sales. The 12" size simply meant the record could be mastered louder -- in vinyl terms, lots of room means lots of noise. The format quickly became the standard for the disco scene. Further experimentation continued with Moore's second outing, a career summary entitled "Try to Hold On." A promotional run was done of the song, in a so-called "normal" as well as disco treatment, in a 12", 33 1/3 format. This lacked the fidelity of the faster-moving record, discouraging loyalty among sonic trendsetters.