B.j. Sharp

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B.J. Sharp's style of blues is comparable to a prize-winning chili recipe. Ingredients such as humorous themes and the ability to say boldly what most women are afraid to say, spiced with a unique outlook…
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Artist Biography by

B.J. Sharp's style of blues is comparable to a prize-winning chili recipe. Ingredients such as humorous themes and the ability to say boldly what most women are afraid to say, spiced with a unique outlook on topics of pain and love, make her a standout.

At age four, Sharp blew out the p.a. system the first time she sang publicly in the community Southern Baptist church. She moved to California after the sudden suicide of her first husband, leaving her to raise two children as a single mom. Upon her arrival, she gave the "old show business a try," performing standup comedy on open mike nights and opening for comedians Robin Williams and Elayne Boosler. Unabashedly, she tackled topics like male/female confrontations, and the fact that women can be tough and even as nasty as men. Sharp never hesitates to tell her audience about her seven ex-husbands, and wittingly calls her backup band the Hus-Bands.

Never Felt No Blues
Her breakthrough came when she began to add singing into her act. Changing her act from stand-up comedy mixed with blues singing to blues singing with comedic commentary, offers of club work began to increase. One night, while performing at Harvelle's, guitarist Jimmy Rip and songwriting partner Mick Jagger walked in. Immediately, Jagger went head over heels for Sharp's act and convinced her to sign to Critique Records, a division of BMG. In fall 1997, her debut album, I Never Felt the Blues Like This, was released. Produced by B.B. King guitarist Alan Mirikitani, its aggressive style brought her notice, notably a Bammie (Bay Area Music Award) nomination for Outstanding Blues Artist.