The Music

The Music

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Without a nerve, the Music arrived in America shortly after the Vines hype of 2002 had simmered down. But unlike their Aussie chart mates, the four boys from Leeds waltzed in with raw confidence. It was about the music, pure and simple. Their name made it obvious and their infectious, brash sound proved it tenfold. The Music, whose members are on the cusp of their twenties, constructed material that's not only aware of what the band is like sonically, but also keenly resistant of current post-grunge flair. The bombast of '60s psychedelia weaved around glazed techno bits give a vibrant overtone to the album itself and the flurry of manic musical bliss is almost immediate. Such a task is impractical to pull off on a first album, however. The Verve's earlier singles -- "All in the Mind" and "Gravity Grave" -- maneuvered such a move and remarkably so, but the Music do it with a lesser degree of cockiness. Frontman Robert Harvey is a near vocal double for Geddy Lee, a matchless prospect for guitarist Adam Nutter. Together, the two are a dynamic pair, roaring and rollicking on "Take the Long Road and Walk It." An unwashed sexiness of "Human" builds upon that formula, maintaining a powerful instrumentation while designing an artsy lyrical stance. Like Richard Ashcroft, the Music seek a simple purpose, which is to love and find a good, solid place. Harvey's muddled vocals twist and moan throughout the white-hot "Float"; "The People" is certainly driving with its political coup de foudre and rock's most basic emotions are heavy. The Music don't necessarily wish to start a fight, but they're tough in staying individualists in an effort to comfortably embrace a chosen path. "You're Love Is Finding a Better Way/Everybody Wants You to Know" from the blistering electronic haze of "Getaway" is a testament to that, and "The Truth Is No Words" follows suit. For a debut album, the Music have managed to take passion to another level, and it's much more stylish than what the Hives, the Vines, and the Strokes have done. They're serious with their craft. Reaching for a spiritual haven is a touch overdone, but it works this time. The Music is an incredible debut and a brilliant example of where rock could be headed.

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