Splash

Spring Break

  • AllMusic Rating
    7
  • User Ratings (0)
  • Your Rating

AllMusic Review by

In a very smart marketing move, the band Splash, featuring Boston's Evangelista Brothers, named their CD after the film series which they contributed soundtrack music to. For some reason, the third Spring Break film was titled Speed Zone, so the moniker-shortened Evans Brothers, manager J.D. Worthington, and BMG-distributed label from Nyack, NY -- Grudge Records -- did their own version of Spring Break. This is an excellent recording by Boston-scene veterans who, despite their years of hard work and excellent musicianship, teetered on the verge of obscurity until this claim to fame. Cherly Lynn, "Miss South Florida," appears on the CD cover with the four bandmembers, a beach and waves in the background, the Spring Break album looking and feeling like the good-time party that it is. There are no credits on the CD, other than "Evans Brothers," the songwriters, and Miss South Florida, a move baseball manager Jimy Williams would call "management decision." This writer saw a cassette demo tape which had "produced by Phil Spector" typed on it. Don't believe it. Much of the music sounds like a clone of Spector's work, but it is not. Allegedly the manager used this ploy to get the record deal. It's too bad, because this Wall of Sound is lots of fun, and no deception should have been necessary to sell this. The rearrangement of "Please Mr. Postman" is chock-full of cascading female vocals and keyboard castanets. It rocks. The originals are great, too; "Bad Times" and "Rags to Riches" are set in the same groove as the two covers, that 1979 Meat Loaf sound which also borrowed heavily from the Ronettes offset by the Black Sabbath riffs on songs like "Radiant Princess" and "Too Hot to Handle," all solid efforts with the Boston-area veteran vocals and guitars in high gear. Splash/the Evangelista Brothers have tons of heart, and their enthusiasm comes across on this BMG-distributed effort. Too bad it didn't get the airplay it deserved, and equally distressing that these sounds have been lost in the rock & roll shuffle. Really worth seeking out.

blue highlight denotes track pick