Brundlefly

By the Way

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    6
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AllMusic Review by

The fragile adolescent-like voice emanating from lead singer Ian Somers, built around a moderate pop formula, is just one of the adorable qualities of the opening dreamy pop of "Move On" and "29 Days." There's also a Brit-pop quality to the album, despite the fact the Canadian roots of the group, with "Revolution" recalling a cross between Oasis and Pulp, while "Today" speaks of sipping Perrier. A distinctive trait of the songs is how there is a constant liquidity and flow, not being bogged down in substandard arrangements. There is also little variance in the songs as the group sticks to what works best for them, particularly with the string section supporting the pop/rock of 'College Try," thereby creating a bigger, more rotund sound. The title track has horns added for a lovable and enticing change without being too emotive musically or lyrically. Only during the last few numbers does the performance wane slightly, but the melancholy of each effort guides it through some rough waters.