Victor Dvoskin

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One of the Soviet Union's top bass players of the 1970s and '80s, Viktor Dvoskin has continued to make his presence felt on the global stage since relocating to the United States in 1993. In addition…
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Joint Venture
One of the Soviet Union's top bass players of the 1970s and '80s, Viktor Dvoskin has continued to make his presence felt on the global stage since relocating to the United States in 1993. In addition to leading his own band, the Viktor Dvoskin Quartet, Dvoskin has collaborated with American jazz musicians Gary Burton and Don Alias, as a member of the international ensemble, Partners of Crime, and the Louis Scherr-led Russian-American band, Jazznost. Featuring six of his original compositions, Jazznost's album, Joint Venture, received four stars in Downbeat magazine.

Initially attracting attention as a member of Allegro, a jazz band led by pianist Nikolai Levinovski, in the 1970s, Dvoskin released his first album, Live at the Grenoble Jazz Festival, as a bandleader, in 1990. The album, which was recorded during a crowd-rousing performance in the French city of Grenoble, received three stars from the Penguin Guide to Jazz, which described his playing as "a rich, dark sound -- some may argue a European sound -- with a very controlled vibrato and a clean, precise, technique."

First coming to the United States, as a member of the Igor Brill Trio, to record an album at New York nightspot, the Village Vanguard in 1988, Dvoskin remained in the country when the recording was delayed. Hooking up with a new band, Partners in Crime, he elected to make Washington DC his permanent home.

Dvoskin has continued to travel back and forth between North America and the former Soviet Union, performing with such instrumentalists as bassist Steve Rudolph and drummer Joe Hunt.

Since the mid-'90s, Dvoskin has performed every Sunday at the Tabard Inn in Washington, DC.