United Empire Loyalists

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Two hundred copies? That was the total number of pressings of "No, No, No," UEL's sole single release (circa 1968). From the outset, UEL's fan base was limited -- only a few hundred of Vancouver, BC's…
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Two hundred copies? That was the total number of pressings of "No, No, No," UEL's sole single release (circa 1968). From the outset, UEL's fan base was limited -- only a few hundred of Vancouver, BC's enlightened teens had ever heard of this band -- until the Vancouver Record Collector's Association rescued them from total oblivion, featuring UEL on the 1983 anthology History of Vancouver Rock and Roll, Volume 3. The group consisted of Rick Enns (lead vocals, bass), Anton "Tom" Kolstey (lead guitar), Jeff Ridley (rhythm guitar), and Glen Hendrickson (drums). Enns was a former member of the Tom Northcott Trio; Hendrickson also pounded the skins for Mock Duck and Orville Dorp. "No, No, No," with its complex but catchy guitar hook, was actually an old Willie Cobb blues tune titled "You Don't Love Me." The band appropriated it from Jerry Garcia and his mates -- having backed the Grateful Dead on more than one occasion. UEL were known for their extended free-form jam sessions a la Cream and Ten Years After. An hour-long studio performance was filmed by the CBC (Canadian Broadcasting Corporation) in 1968 as part of the Enterprise television series (lost in a dusty vault somewhere?). Barring its rediscovery, UEL will remain more legend than reality.