Marie Bradley

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Quite a fleeting presence in classic blues, Marie Bradley cut a handful of sides and is also thought to have helped write ditties howled by other artists, although once again nothing particularly famous.…
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Quite a fleeting presence in classic blues, Marie Bradley cut a handful of sides and is also thought to have helped write ditties howled by other artists, although once again nothing particularly famous. From the appearance of documentation she went into the recording studios twice sometime in February and April of 1927. Only five different songs emerged from these sessions and although this is hardly an impressive number in comparison with the prolific output of the genre's stars, it is also not a stone that sank into the pond without a single skip.

Bradley made a strong impression as a powerful vocalist, prompting the barrelhouse legend Alex Moore to hint that she might have invented her own style of blues music.

"Down Home Moan" prompted a "you can say that again" from the original engineers, resulting in three takes over the two sessions, all of which have been reissused on Selmerphone and Document compilations. Her accompanist was Will Ezell, a superb early barrelhouse pianist; a compilation issued under his name includes some of the work with Bradley. A release by Mattie Dorsey cut later the same year for the Paramount "race records" series is credited to Bradley and Troy Snapp as writers. It is entitled "Love Me Daddy Blues" and while it is about as remarkable as its title it does provide a link between Bradley and an exotic clique of underling blues artists plying their trade in the late '20s such as Snapp and the guitarist Blind Roosevelt Graves, often part of the package when Ezell showed up to back a singer.