Litsa Davies

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b. Litsa Jane Davies, 27 June 1963, Hampshire, England. Growing up in Poole, Dorset, Davies attended Harry Harbin school where her music teacher, Dave Lewin, recognized her singing talent. At 14 she was…
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b. Litsa Jane Davies, 27 June 1963, Hampshire, England. Growing up in Poole, Dorset, Davies attended Harry Harbin school where her music teacher, Dave Lewin, recognized her singing talent. At 14 she was singing with him on jazz gigs and appeared locally on television in 1977. In 1979 she gigged with pianist Mike Hatchard and the following year began a six-year stint with the National Youth Jazz Orchestra with whom she appeared on television. While with NYJO Davies sang on three albums, notably Why Don’t They Write Songs Like This Anymore?, which featured her throughout. She also sang with her own quintet and toured with the European Jazz Orchestra. She sang on radio with the BBC Big Band, her own group, and the bands Night Owls and Bone Structure. During the early and mid-80s she was most often heard at festivals with her quintet which usually comprised Steve Melling, Rick Taylor, Steve Pearce, Mike Paxton and Dave Barlow. In 1986 Davies sang with the Burch Trio and with saxophonist Iain Ballamy. The following year she joined the cast of the London West End musical Chess at the Prince Edward Theatre going on to play the lead until the show closed in 1989. She continued to sing on BBC radio.

From 1990 onwards Davies was occupied with looking after her two young children, but she was able to sing as a backing vocalist to Tom Jones at the Glastonbury Festival and to perform with various bands including the Ian Pearce Big Band, the Ross Mitchell Dance Orchestra and the Mark Graham Dance Band. In 1995 she reappeared in the jazz bigtime with a week-long engagement at Ronnie Scott’s club backed by Melling, Simon Woolf and Dave Ohm. An extremely gifted singer, with fine interpretative skills allied to intelligent phrasing, Davies is at her considerable best and is most pleasing on ballads. On up-tempo songs, she sings with zesty attack and great swing.