Herbert Fields

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b. 26 July 1897, New York City, New York, USA, d. 24 March 1958, New York City, New York, USA. Fields was born into a family environment that was thoroughly immersed in showbusiness. His father was Lew…
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b. 26 July 1897, New York City, New York, USA, d. 24 March 1958, New York City, New York, USA. Fields was born into a family environment that was thoroughly immersed in showbusiness. His father was Lew Fields, his older brother was Joseph Fields, and his younger sister was Dorothy Fields. After graduation from Columbia University, he worked as an actor on stage and in the silent film, The Porcelain Lamp (1921). While in his twenties, he worked as a choreographer and director but most notably as librettist on musical shows for some of which the music was written by markedly outstanding composers and lyricists such as Cole Porter and Richard Rodgers and Lorenz Hart. He also collaborated as librettist with his sister Dorothy through into the 50s. Among these shows were Dearest Enemy and The Garrick Gaities (both 1925), Hit The Deck! and A Connecticut Yankee (1927), Present Arms (1928), Fifty Million Frenchmen (1929), The New Yorkers (1930), Pardon My English (1932), Du Barry Was A Lady (1939), Panama Hattie (1940), Let’s Face It! (1941), Something For The Boys (1943), Mexican Hayride (1944), Annie Get Your Gun (1946), Up In Central Park (1947), Arms And The Girl (1950), and By The Beautiful Sea (1954). Concurrent with his stage work, Fields also wrote several Hollywood screenplays, including Hands Across The Table (1935), Fools For Scandal (1938) and Father Takes A Wife (1941). Towards the end of the 50s, he and his sister were working together on another Broadway production, the Tony Award -winning Redhead (1959), which starred Gwen Verdon, when he died.