George Hall

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b. USA. George Hall And His Orchestra usually operated under the legend ‘Dance with Romance’, and this was an accurate description of their big band sound. Formed In New York City, New York, USA,…
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b. USA. George Hall And His Orchestra usually operated under the legend ‘Dance with Romance’, and this was an accurate description of their big band sound. Formed In New York City, New York, USA, during the early 20s, Hall recruited George Knapp, Frank Comisky, Sam Horowitz, Mike Martini, Ben Rapfogel, Charles Ruoff, Moe Spivak, Rudy Reinhart, Jack Linton, Sam Rore, Phil Silverman, Howard Carlson, John Sterling, Abe Markowitz, William Sorrendtino, Charles Romano, Frank Klinger, Fred Duro, Bernie Miller, Jack Shilkret, Johnny Doyle, George Paxton, Michael Bruce, Johnny Guarnieri, Doc Goldberg, Joe Ferrante, Charles Zimmerman, Carmen Mastren and Bud Lacombe. The vocalists with the band included Scrappy Lambert, Loretta Lee, Irving Kaufman, Barry Wells, Allen Church and Johnny McKeevern. With extensive engagements at the Hotel Taft and Paramount, plus Loew’s State Theater in New York, the orchestra became one of the most popular in the metropolis during the 30s. Hall also took the band on tours of entertainment parks and hotels in Memphis, Dallas and Denver, under the aegis of the MCA organisation. By the mid-30s Dolly Dawn had joined as their featured vocalist, adding new lustre to their theme song, ‘Love Letters In The Sand’. Indeed, many of the band’s recordings of this period (they had recorded for Pathé, Banner, Cameo Records, Bluebird Records, Variety, Vocalion Records and OKeh Records) were ascribed to Dolly Dawn And Her Dawn Patrol. Eventually Hall turned the band over to her leadership in a ceremony at New York’s Roseland Ballroom on 4 July 1941. Hall became their manager, but the much-publicised new venture never worked, and Dawn left after a year. Disillusioned, Hall declined to take up its leadership again, and one of the finest east coast big bands of the pre-war period died with that decision.