Charlie Arrington

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In the '20s and '30s, Charlie Arrington was a highly in-demand fiddle player on old-time and country sessions and bandstands. To be really accurate, the old-time music was the country music of the time,…
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In the '20s and '30s, Charlie Arrington was a highly in-demand fiddle player on old-time and country sessions and bandstands. To be really accurate, the old-time music was the country music of the time, with the latter term only beginning to be reluctantly scribbled in, in pencil. The fiddler was a member of Paul Warmack & His Gully Jumpers in the late '20s, enjoying success with this group as it released the first-ever recording to be cut in Nashville -- certainly setting a trend with that move -- and nabbed a Grand Old Opry spot that was good for decades, even though it was slowly whittled away to a set that lasted about as long as the text on the back of a postcard. In 1936 and 1937, he also performed and recorded with the wonderful Uncle Dave Macon, leaving behind a set of duets that are high points in the old-time music discography. Arrington's stock in trade was fiddle music from the Tennessee archives. In the early studio days of the Gully Jumpers, the fiddler was featured on exciting renditions of "Stone Rag" and "Robertson County." The former fiddle tune was a creation of fiddler Oscar Stone of the rival group Dr. Humphrey Bate and the Possum Hunters, although Stone himself never recorded it.