Ladakh 567

Ladakh 567

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Following the disbanding of Pluto, Pavel Fajt, a leading figure in Czech alternative rock, began to diversify, multiplying his involvement in unexpected projects. Ladakh is a duo he forms with Václav Korínek, a singer and performance artist who plays percussion in a highly physical, ritualistic way and uses throat singing to give his music an eerie sound. Ladakh 567 consists of nine wordless songs. Fajt hammers his trademark heavy beats made of acoustic and electronic drums, close in style to more straightforward tracks on the Danubians album. Korínek builds over them multi-tracked vocal parts: murmured incantations, along with onomatopoeic phrases that become rhythm patterns once looped and entrancing overtone singing. He adds ethnic percussion and synthesizers, helped by Fajt and guests Radek Michalko and Jirí Hradil. The spacy keyboards give a world fusion feel to the music, evoking the Enid. The music is actually fresh and thrilling, despite its wider appeal and occasional lack of substance. Some cuts, especially "Elvis" and the busy "Frajer Bodo," work really well on the dancefloor. Fajt's followers are in for a surprise, but if you can get over the shock of hearing him in such a listener-friendly environment, Ladakh 567 becomes a highly enjoyable record with lots of tribal-like drumming and odd sounds.

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