Edvaldo Santana

Edvaldo Santana

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Another effort by Edvaldo Santana in search of some room for his corrosive, ironic lyrics dealing with outcasts in Brazil. The album opens with the contagiously swinging "Samba de Trem," a curious crossover between samba, blues guitar, and gafieira (evoked in the trombone counterpoint). The self-description "Blues Caboclo" brings strong Northeastern influences mixed with bluesy licks. "Zensider," a reggae, explores the absurd. "Sem Cena" is a blues dealing with separation. "Ruas de São Miguel" opens with a blues setting topped by berimbau sounds, introducing a rock tune. "Canção Pequena" is a touching song about a youngster of the streets who lives as can until dead by the police. The sounds of ancient seresta are recalled in "Sonho Azul," which appropriately describes a nostalgic situation of a lost love. Existential pain and reggae fill "Dor Elegante." Satire is the focal point of "Cabral, Gagarin e Bill Gates." "Paulistanóide" is Edvaldo's version for the love for the city of São Paulo, previously portrayed in a high number of songs like Paulo Vanzolini's "Ronda," Caetano Veloso's "Sampa," and others. Not surprisingly, Edvaldo's version brings figures of prostitutes, stressed urban professionals, neurosis, and other similar figures in a lively and swinging pop-axé tune. "Mestiça" uses Latin rock to talk about Brazilian music. The most critic song is "Covarde," where the anger is directed to publicity creators who "transform scoundrels in heroes." "Beija-Flor" uses a strangely morbid formula to describe a guy attached to a hospital bed: "A hummingbird drank from the serum tube inserted in my arm," etc. Edvaldo Santana affirms himself in his own category, where social critic joins blues-based pop music.

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