William Moore

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He is not the trumpeter from the California Ramblers, to name just one performer with a similar name to William Moore who worked during the same era. Moving swiftly through decades, as errors by discographers…
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He is not the trumpeter from the California Ramblers, to name just one performer with a similar name to William Moore who worked during the same era. Moving swiftly through decades, as errors by discographers are bound to do, he is also not the arranger who worked for the Jimmie Lunceford band, the drummer for Ray Charles, or a Euro-disco hitmaker. Heading back to the Roaring Twenties, which is an era when a tuba player could actually find employment in a jazz band, he is also not the William Moore who recorded country blues for Paramount in the latter part of that decade.

There is at least one aspect of this William Moore's music-making in which he could be said to be Moore significant than any others with his surname, and it isn't because he could hit a lower note than anyone else. The tuba player Moore took on the challenging assignment of pianist and composer Jelly Roll Morton's new music and arrangements in the '20s, performing and recording with outfits such as Jelly Roll Morton & His Hot Peppers. A direct and natural result of this is Moore's inclusion on the list of the most important jazz instrumentalists of all time, a roster culled from the names of performers who took part in creating those recordings considered most important in the history of jazz. Few such lists exist without these Morton Victor titles such as "Steamboat Stomp" included; those that do are simply incomplete, an opinion Moore would have gladly punctuated with an oomph or two from his tuba.