William "Bunny Rugs" Clarke

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This reggae artist may have adopted the nickname of "Bunny" in order to avoid confusion with many other performers named William Clark, not to mention the famed explorer. But if there is some spiritual…
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This reggae artist may have adopted the nickname of "Bunny" in order to avoid confusion with many other performers named William Clark, not to mention the famed explorer. But if there is some spiritual kinship claimed with rabbits, it would have to be the same breed that tragically eat a great deal of the marijuana crop in the novel Budding Prospects by T. Coraghessan Boyle. Such an impression has been created by the song "Bush Weed Contrash", which certainly seems to be one of Clarke's most widely-discussed contributions to reggae culture.

That impression, in turn, has been created by an almost total lack of discussion concerning the reggae rabbit's other songwriting titles, be they dance hits ("Dancing on the Floor") or romantic threats ("Love is Out to Get You"). While it is most untrue that dope-smoking is the only thing reggae artists are willing to sing about, it sometimes seems as if the people doing research don't have a moment for anything else. Clarke's duo with Ricky Grant, Bunny and Ricky, cut "Bush Weed Contrash" in 1975. In one of Lee "Scratch" Perry's fine productions, a Black Ark rhythm section is used as the background for a seminar on the dissapointments experienced whilst trying to procure good quality ganja. Clarke's songs and vocal performances, ranging from fairly straight to strangely distorted, are also associated with the Third World group.