The Mile Ends

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A popular mid-'60s Phoenix garage band, the Mile Ends recorded just one single, "Bottle Up and Go"/"Candy Man," released on the small local Fifth Estate label in 1966. The Mile Ends were extremely Rolling…
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A popular mid-'60s Phoenix garage band, the Mile Ends recorded just one single, "Bottle Up and Go"/"Candy Man," released on the small local Fifth Estate label in 1966. The Mile Ends were extremely Rolling Stones-influenced, as was evidenced on the original "Bottle Up and Go," a fine punky, bluesy garage tune with a jerky rhythm. The other side, a cover of "Candy Man" (made famous by Roy Orbison in the early '60s) was less impressive. Singer/guitarist Mike McFadden, author of "Bottle Up and Go," went on to play in the light psychedelic band Superfine Dandelion that put out an LP on Mainstream in 1967 (and that also included bassist Ed Black, who had played in a late version of the Mile Ends). "Bottle Up and Go" reached a wider audience when it was included on one of the very first compilations of obscure 1960s garage singles, Ear-Piercing Punk, and both sides of the 45 are on Sundazed's expanded CD reissue of the Superfine Dandelion album. That CD also has two previously unissued songs by the Mile Ends, 1966 covers of the Pretty Things' "I Can Never Say" and Them's "Bring 'Em on In," that certainly prove they were devoted fans of the era's British rock; not many American acts of the time were playing anything by the Pretty Things, let alone Pretty Things cuts that weren't even hits in the U.K.