Tex Johnson

b. 30 October 1960, St. Vincent, West Indies. Johnson emigrated with his family to the UK in the 60s, completing his education in Stratford, east London. His initial recording was a self-production with…
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Artist Biography

b. 30 October 1960, St. Vincent, West Indies. Johnson emigrated with his family to the UK in the 60s, completing his education in Stratford, east London. His initial recording was a self-production with David Tyrone of Venture, ‘I Wanna Hold You All Night Long’. Encouraged by the sales of his debut he decided to take control of his career with the inauguration of the Discotex label. The project proved encouraging with the release of Johnson’s successful follow-up, ‘Pillow Talk’, which proved a massive hit in 1981. In 1982 he recorded ‘Cork Inna Dance’ with the UK-based producer Lloyd Cave, which helped to finance further releases under the Discotex banner, including ‘Reggae Rhumba’ and ‘Love To Love You’. His Christmas release was a double a-sided chart buster in the lovers rock style, ‘Honey’, and an exhibition of his DJ style on ‘Girls Girls Girls’. By 1983 he released ‘Body Snatch’ and ‘Crowd Of People’, both in combination with DJ Ranking Ivan, alongside ‘Womaniser’ and ‘Can’t Get By Without You’. The hits continued with ‘The Girl Next Door’, ‘Song Book Of Love’, ‘Ask For A Dance’ and an outstanding combination hit with Annette Brisset, ‘Eye To Eye’. Throughout his career he has released a number of successful albums but has been unable to emulate the runaway success of ‘Pillow Talk’ in the singles market. As a producer he carved a considerable niche in the revival market when he enrolled Errol V, Blacksteel and Hector Cross, brother of Sandra Cross, to perform as Klearview Harmonix for the phenomenally successful Happy Memories compilations. The albums featured faultless cover versions of reggae classics produced by Johnson. Volume 5 of the series featured Paulette Tajah performing classic lovers rock hits. In the 90s he concentrated on his production skills, although in 1992 he recorded ‘That’s Life’. He continues to produce and release lovers and roots compilations, asserting his aspirations towards ‘Keeping reggae music sweet, clean, loving and conscious’.