Smalltown Parade

London, England indie quartet comprising Robert Moore (b. 1 November 1963, Haverhill, Suffolk, England; bass), Paul Bevoir (b. 29 May 1960, Islington, London, England; vocals, guitar), Simon Smith (b.…
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Artist Biography

London, England indie quartet comprising Robert Moore (b. 1 November 1963, Haverhill, Suffolk, England; bass), Paul Bevoir (b. 29 May 1960, Islington, London, England; vocals, guitar), Simon Smith (b. 3 December 1958, Merton Park, London, England; drums) and Simon Taylor (b. 28 December 1960, Redhill, Surrey, England; keyboards). The band convened first in April 1980 when sleeve designer Bevoir invited Smith (ex-Mood Six) to see his collection of Corgi toy cars. Smalltown Parade were formed thereafter, though the original bass and guitar incumbents, drawn from San Francisco and Berlin, proved temporary. Just two months later the band’s ‘The Sunday Way Of Life’ won Gary Crowley’s BBC GLR Demo Clash for five consecutive weeks. In July this was released as a limited edition single on Captain Sensible’s Deltic Records, by which time the band had been augmented by the addition of Moore. Following a publishing contract signed in February 1991 with Japanese organization NTVM, ‘And We Dance On’ was released to strong critical acclaim. By May, Taylor (also ex-Mood Six) had introduced himself to the band, and also befriended Rolf Harris at a party. The Australian master of the billabong duly agreed to appear on the video to the third single, ‘Watching Mary Go Round’, painting a 20ft canvas of the group as they performed. A series of gigs ensued as ‘token indie pop band’ on Number One magazine roadshows, Moore at one point being mistaken for a member of Take That, before a charity appearance alongside Dannii Minogue at London’s Empire Ballroom. However, some of the band’s impetus dissipated until, in 1993, ‘Watching Mary Go Round’ became a rejuvenated club hit in Japan, prompting Polystar Records to sign the band for a debut album, Get Beautiful. Rave reviews in the Orient were commonplace but the band were unable to capitalize on this success owing to Bevoir’s fear of flying. A second album followed a year later, again to an encouraging response, though by this time the sound was much leaner and more direct. It was followed by a Bevoir solo album, while in 1995 work began on a third Smalltown Parade set. Odds and ends were collected on a compilation by Tangerine Records.