Norman Haines

b. Birmingham, England. Haines was initially a member of aspiring Midlands-based beat group, the Brumbeats. Having switched from guitar to keyboards, he formed the Locomotive in 1966. He wrote much of…
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Artist Biography

b. Birmingham, England. Haines was initially a member of aspiring Midlands-based beat group, the Brumbeats. Having switched from guitar to keyboards, he formed the Locomotive in 1966. He wrote much of their material, including the reggae-influenced hit, ‘Rudi’s In Love’ (1968). Locomotive then pursued a heavy, progressive sound, the style of which Haines followed upon the group’s disintegration in 1969. He formed a new band, the Sacrifice, with Neil Clark (guitar), Andy Hughes (bass) and Jimmy Skidmore (drums). However, Haines’ record company, Parlophone Records, were unhappy with the name and the unit’s 1970 debut, ‘Daffodil’, was credited to ‘the Norman Haynes Band’ (sic). This, with corrected spelling, became the unit’s official title. Den Of Iniquity ensued and this musically ambitious collection is now rightly regarded as one of the classics of its era. Its highlights included a dazzling remake of ‘Mr. Armageddon’, previously recorded by Locomotive, and two exceptional, lengthy instrumentals, ‘Rabbits’ and ‘Life Is So Unkind’. Haines then disbanded his group, recording ‘Give It To You Girl’ as a solo artist in 1972. He subsequently left music altogether.