Nappy Lamare

Biography by

Nappy Lamare became famous for his occasional vocals with Bob Crosby's Bobcats and, although he rarely soloed, he appeared on many hot recording sessions. Lamare was part of the very viable jazz scene…
Read Full Biography

Artist Biography by

Nappy Lamare became famous for his occasional vocals with Bob Crosby's Bobcats and, although he rarely soloed, he appeared on many hot recording sessions. Lamare was part of the very viable jazz scene in 1920s New Orleans, playing with Monk Hazel, Sharkey Bonano, and Johnny Bayersdorffer Jazzola Novelty Orchestra, among others. Lamare, who made his recording debut with John Hyman's Bayou Stompers in 1927, went up North and joined Ben Pollack in 1930. When Pollack's band was taken over by Bob Crosby in 1935, Lamare was part of the personnel, staying with Crosby until 1942 and appearing on scores of recordings. The guitarist (who was known for his humorous novelty vocals) was with Eddie Miller's short-lived big band in 1943 and took over its nucleus the following year when Miller was drafted. Lamare settled in Los Angeles where he was a part of the local Dixieland scene for decades. During 1945-1950, Lamare led sessions for Capitol, Mercury, Dixieland Jubilee, and a full LP (put out by Fairmont) that documented live appearances from 1947. In later years, Lamare often had reunions with Crosby and frequently co-led a Dixieland band with Ray Bauduc. Although he rarely ever soloed, and his vocals are today rather dated, Nappy Lamare remains a famous name in Dixieland circles.