Mel Hague

b. 20 January 1943, Whiston, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. Though born in England, Hague grew up in Canada, where he first discovered his love of country music. He had moved there at age eight…
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Artist Biography

b. 20 January 1943, Whiston, Rotherham, South Yorkshire, England. Though born in England, Hague grew up in Canada, where he first discovered his love of country music. He had moved there at age eight to obtain treatment for the cerebral palsy condition from which he suffered (doctors had originally diagnosed him as unlikely ever to walk). On arrival back in Rotherham, England, in 1961, he formed his first group, the Paladins, before putting together the Westernaires trio three years later. This outfit continued to tour widely, winning the West Country Music Association Most Entertaining Band Award in 1973 - which led to a recording contract with Jim Fowley, head of Look Records. A debut album, The Winner, was released, showcasing Hague’s songwriting skills on tracks such as ‘Don’t Call Me A Cowboy’, ‘Lisa’ and ‘As Close To Me As You’. The band continued until 1976 when Hague went solo. Among many awards he has collected on his travels are the Daily Mirror’s Golden Guitar Award (in a nationwide ballot sponsored by Aria Guitars) and nominations for the Top British Country Music Songwriter by the Country Music Association (coming second two years running). He has also worked extensively promoting country music on local radio, and raised money for the 1981 Year Of The Disabled by riding a bicycle from Doncaster to Wembley, arriving in time for the festival there (he had never ridden a bike before). In 1987 Hague elected to return to a band format, adding Nick Strutt (guitars, mandolin), Andy Seward (bass) and John Firminger (drums) to broaden his sound.