Leyton Buzzards

This new wave/pop act was formed by Geoffrey Deanne (b. 10 December 1954, London, England; vocals) and David Jaymes (b. 28 December 1954, Woodford, Essex, England; bass), with additional members Kevin…
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Artist Biography

This new wave/pop act was formed by Geoffrey Deanne (b. 10 December 1954, London, England; vocals) and David Jaymes (b. 28 December 1954, Woodford, Essex, England; bass), with additional members Kevin Steptoe (drums) and Dave Monk (guitar). From playing R&B cover versions on the pub circuit, they changed direction in 1976 after witnessing the new punk movement at the Roxy Club in London. By the following year they had secured a recording contract with Small Wonder Records, releasing the single ‘19 & Mad’, and changing surnames to the likes of Nick Nayme (Deanne) to reinforce their new image. After the single, Monk was replaced by Vernon Austin. After entering The Band Of Hope And Glory contest, jointly sponsored by the Sun newspaper and BBC Radio 1, they won the final at the London Palladium. Their prize was a recording contract with Chrysalis Records. The result was the band’s best-remembered moment, as ‘Saturday Night (Beneath The Plastic Palm Trees)’ saw them appearing on Top Of The Pops, celebrating band members’ former weekend drinking and fighting antics. Shortening their name to the Buzzards, they were unable to capitalize on their early success, though their last Chrysalis single, ‘We Make A Noise’, featured a cover designed by Monty Python’s Terry Gilliam. The contract-fulfilling Jellied Eels To Record Deals compiled early singles, demos, and radio session tracks. Their final recording was a one-off single for WEA Records titled ‘Can’t Get Used To Losing You’, before Deane and Jaymes set up the more successful, salsa-flavoured Modern Romance.