Jim Buffington

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Drummer Jim Buffington was a popular choice for combos on the mid-'50s Philly scene, meaning he could squeeze out the rock & roll juice of the day, something laced with much more swing than the potion…
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Drummer Jim Buffington was a popular choice for combos on the mid-'50s Philly scene, meaning he could squeeze out the rock & roll juice of the day, something laced with much more swing than the potion sipped by '90s arena rockers. A well-known example of a fresh '50s rock sound was Bill Haley & His Comets, bringing the subject around to what became Buffington's most famous recording affiliation, the Jodimars. This was a group that was formed in 1955 as an actual spin-off of Haley's group. Take the "Jo" from Joey D'Ambrosio, the "Di" from Dick Richards, and the "Mars" from Marshall Lytle and there's a band name, although it sounds a bit more like the brand name of a hiking boot.

As the story goes, a regal singer friend named Peggy King got tired of hearing these three whine about their boss Haley and told them to shut up and start their own group. Buffington was one of three Philadelphia freelancers brought in to fill up the sound of the new group at its first demo sessions. Others were pianist Bob Simpson and guitarist Charlie Hess, the latter man an ex-member of one of Haley's earlier groups. The Jodimars spent several years trying to concoct a hit record and Buffington was not the only drummer who thumped on the group's efforts. Discographers have tracked down "Rock-a-Beatin' Boogie," "Flip, Flop and Fly," and "possibly" "The Big Beat" as tracks featuring Buffington.