Irene Delroy

b. 1898, Bloomington, Illinois, USA, d. unknown date and location, USA. In the 20s Delroy appeared in revues including, on Broadway, Frivolities Of 1920, Greenwich Village Follies (1923 and 1925, singing…
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Artist Biography

b. 1898, Bloomington, Illinois, USA, d. unknown date and location, USA. In the 20s Delroy appeared in revues including, on Broadway, Frivolities Of 1920, Greenwich Village Follies (1923 and 1925, singing in the latter Harold Levey and Owen Murphy’s ‘You Have Me - I Have You’ with William Ladd), Vogues Of 1924, Round The Town (1924) and Ziegfeld Follies Of 1927, singing Irving Berlin’s ‘Ooh! Maybe It’s You’ with Franklyn Baur. The book for Here’s Howe (1928) was by Fred Thompson and Paul Gerard Smith, music by Roger Wolfe Kahn and Joseph Meyer, lyrics by Irving Caesar. Also in the cast with Delroy were Ben Bernie and Eric Blore. She was then in Follow Thru (1929), which ran for 401 performances at Chanin’s 46th Street Theatre. The book was by Laurence Schwab and Buddy De Sylva, music by Ray Henderson and lyrics by Lew Brown and De Sylva. Other cast members included Jack Haley, Zelma O’Neal and, making her Broadway debut, Eleanor Powell. Next, at the same theatre, Delroy was in Top Speed (1929), with book and songs by Guy Bolton, Bert Kalmar and Harry Ruby. Making her first important New York stage appearance in the show was Ginger Rogers.

After this show, which ran for 104 performances, Delroy went to Hollywood to try her hand in films. Delroy had appeared in a silent, 1921’s The Inside Of The Cup, and now brought her lively presence and sometimes her singing ability to a handful of films that might charitably be described as inadequate. First was Oh, Sailor Behave! (1930), a version of the Broadway musical show that had starred Claudette Colbert in the role taken by Delroy. Co-starring was former Broadway leading man Charles King. Next came The Life Of The Party (1930), with other former Broadway performers, Jack Whiting and Winnie Lightner. Then, Delroy and Whiting co-starred in Men Of The Sky (1931), a musical with songs such as ‘Every Little While’ and ‘Stolen Dreams’, by Jerome Kern and Otto Harbach, the latter appearing on screen as a French soldier. Most of the songs written for the film were recorded. Divorce Among Friends (1930), directed by Roy Del Ruth, was also a box-office failure, and Delroy’s Hollywood career came to an abrupt halt. She returned to the theatre, including playing in a 1935 touring production of Anything Goes with William Gaxton, Victor Moore and Benay Venuta.