Harry White

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Soul-jazz detectives tend to deduce that a flügelhorn credit on Freddie Roach's My People (Soul People) album epic from 1967 has nothing to do with trombonist Harry White, who played with soul people…
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Soul-jazz detectives tend to deduce that a flügelhorn credit on Freddie Roach's My People (Soul People) album epic from 1967 has nothing to do with trombonist Harry White, who played with soul people of his own, Cab Calloway among them. Topping the illuminations behind this assumption is the fact that the latter horn player was dead for nearly five years by the time keyboardist, flutist, and vocalist Roach cut what would turn out to be his final album. A research assistant instructed to find further evidence of recording or performance activity involving this man on either flügelhorn or trumpet was soon physically assaulted by several boisterous discographers who insisted it was Henry White who played the Roach date, not Harry White.

"It's a common enough mistake, since Harry White played on "Reefer Man" and Roach's name is, well, Roach," one of the more mellow discographers admitted after checking out a few of the research assistant's defensive moves. "Henry White played guitar," a Southern expert in sidemen nobody has ever heard of ventured, however, when asked to produce evidence of a man of that name who blew a flügelhorn. Henry or Harry, the flügelhorn man can be proud to say that 100 percent of his discography was recorded by none other than the illustrious jazz recording engineer Rudy Van Gelder, responsible for many fine sessions on the final label Roach had the Prestige of recording for, so to speak. No other trumpet stuff shows up under Harry White and data for Henry White are equally single-minded, as in Tom Lord's precise discographical poetry: "1...1967...flhrn."