Frozen Noses

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It's a matter of some contention whether the Frozen Noses should even be considered a group, as they never released any records or played live. However, the band -- if they can be called that -- occupy…
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It's a matter of some contention whether the Frozen Noses should even be considered a group, as they never released any records or played live. However, the band -- if they can be called that -- occupy a significant place in the lore of Crosby, Stills & Nash that serious fans of the band are often curious about, and want clarified.

Basically, the Frozen Noses were the duo of David Crosby and Stephen Stills, who in mid-1968 recorded a three-track demo of songs that appeared on the first Crosby, Stills & Nash album: "Guinevere," "49 Bye-Byes," and "Long Time Gone." Somehow Los Angeles disc jockey B. Mitchell Reed got a copy and played them on the radio, where he attributed the recordings to the Frozen Noses. As for why the name Frozen Noses was selected, David Crosby confirmed in Dave Zimmer's Crosby, Stills & Nash: The Authorized Biography, "Stills and I were just starting to become cokeheads at the time, so the name Frozen Noses was, well, it spoke for itself." When Graham Nash joined the duo after this recording, Crosby, Stills & Nash were born.

As for the music itself, the demo versions were fairly close to the ones that ended up on Crosby, Stills & Nash, with "Long Time Gone" and "49 Bye-Byes" featuring full-band arrangements. The obvious difference was the absence of Graham Nash's harmonies; also, "Long Time Gone" has additional lyrics, and "49 Bye-Byes" has some backwards effects. All three tracks have surfaced on bootleg.