Fanny

Warner Brothers Records claimed in 1970 that their recent signing Fanny were the ‘first all-female rock group’. They sustained a career for four years on that basis, throwing off all rivals to the…
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Artist Biography

Warner Brothers Records claimed in 1970 that their recent signing Fanny were the ‘first all-female rock group’. They sustained a career for four years on that basis, throwing off all rivals to the throne, including Birtha, whose tasteless publicity handout stated ‘Birtha has balls’. Formerly Wild Honey, the name Fanny was suggested by George Harrison to their producer Richard Perry. It was only later in their career that the group realized how risqué their name was internationally. Comprising Jean Millington (b. 1950, Manila, California, USA; bass, vocals), June Millington (b. 1949, Manila, California, USA; guitar, vocals), Alice DeBuhr (b. 1950, Mason City, Iowa, USA; drums) and Nickey Barclay (b. 1951, Washington, DC, USA; keyboards), their blend of driving hard rock and rock ‘n’ roll was exciting, although they were always a second division act. They were more popular in the UK where they toured regularly, recording albums at Apple and Olympic studios. June Millington and DeBuhr were replaced in 1974 by Patti Quatro (sister of Suzi Quatro) from the Pleasure Seekers, and Brie Brandt-Howard. None of their albums charted in the UK and their sales in the USA were minimal. Their second album, Charity Ball was their best work, giving them a US Top 40 hit with the title song. Todd Rundgren was brought in to produce Mother’s Pride, but ironically it was as the band was fragmenting in 1975 that they scored their biggest hit ‘Butter Boy’ (US number 29). June and Jean Millington reunited to form Millington, who released their only album in 1978.