Edd Miller

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Of the various folks in the music business whose proper names would be Edward Miller, the credit of Eddie Miller seems to be preferred. Perhaps this variation sounds more friendly than just plain Ed Miller,…
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Of the various folks in the music business whose proper names would be Edward Miller, the credit of Eddie Miller seems to be preferred. Perhaps this variation sounds more friendly than just plain Ed Miller, but if friendliness is the goal, then it must be considered ironic that there are so many people with this name who are professional recording engineers and producers, people not always expected to practice kindly behavior. An exception to all of these observations is Edd Miller: he not only prefers Ed to Eddie, he has a reputation for courtesy as well as inspiration and clean recordings. As a result of his spelling double-dipping, he manages to avoid some, but not all, of the confusion regarding such a common name.

The two West coast producers and instrumentalists named Eddie Miller tend to get confused with each other, not Edd Miller; that was, until one of the former fellows began dabbling in country. It is possible to find a credit misplaced under Eddie, but more often Ed, sometimes the result of a meticulous editor who thinks there is no such spelling as Edd. Associated with the Atlanta music scene since 1984, Edd Miller should also not be mistaken for an Ed Miller such as the Scottish singer, several journalists, and a North Carolina booking agent who was famous for speaking rapidly.

Edd Miller started playing in bands at the age of 12, moving from Louisiana to Atlanta and working for a recording studio. In the late '80s, Miller joined up with the extended crew of the hard-rocking .38 Special, working primarily as a drum monitor mixer and scoring the first of an interesting and ongoing series of credits on tambourine. Of course, Miller is best known for a combination of production skills including engineering and mixing, taking on some assignments single-handedly as well as coming in as an assistant to big time producers such as Rodney Mills, Bob Ezrin, Howard Benson, and J.J. French of Twisted Sister. Sometimes an assistant engineer's coolest move is to break out a tambourine on a song, providing the jingle-jangle can actually keep a beat. Trained as a percussionist early on, Miller could hardly drop a beat as casually as typesetters have changed Edd to Ed. He also provides instrumental assistance on several axes that requires much more study and finesse to play accurately than a tambourine, including banjo and the horrifying alto clarinet.

Since 1993, Miller has been a staff producer and engineer for the Ichiban record label; as a whole, the Miller discography is a superb blend of blues, avant-garde rock, gospel, rhythm & blues, and good old rock & roll, a freezer full of chops that might be expected from someone hanging around Atlanta. Also to be expected are moments when the maelstrom of Miller memorandum renders something of a divine double-layer cake rather than a crumble of confusion. For example, country legend Willie Nelson has worked with both Edd Miller and the recording engineer, and percussionist Eddie Miller, whose most infamous affiliation was rap group 2 Live Crew. Edd Miller collaborated with Sam Arlen, the son of the famous songwriter Harold Arlen, a name that was often in the left-hand corner of the sheet music played by legendary session man and big-band saxophonist Eddie Miller. Projects such as Phunk Junkeez once again suggest a joining-at-the-hip with the previously mentioned rap engineer Eddie Miller. Edd Miller's banjo credit on a Drivin' n' Cryin' album might divert royalty checks from the Eddie Miller who wrote "Release Me" and more than 1,000 other country & western songs.