Dorothy Everetts

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While some blues scholars are content to throw their hands in the air and declare that there is no such thing as personal information on Dorothy Everetts, other tireless researchers have come up with…
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While some blues scholars are content to throw their hands in the air and declare that there is no such thing as personal information on Dorothy Everetts, other tireless researchers have come up with facts beyond the mere existence of two songs, "Fat Mouth Blues" and "Macon Blues." She recorded the pair of ditties in New Orleans, at least providing a location for the mystery, and a good one at that. The sessions were part of Columbia's recording activities in that city during 1928 involving -- in less than one week -- artists such as bandleader Oscar Celestin, the entire Halfway House Dance Orchestra, and a trio called the Jackson Blue Boys that featured the wonderful Bo Carter.

Everetts recorded with the traditional, classic blues accompaniment of only a pianist on the same day as the latter combo, meaning busy hours for Columbia's famed producer Frank Walker. A letter he wrote to friend and fellow record producer Joe Davis during this New Orleans sojourn includes details that may be of special interest to those attempting to understand the complete history of punk music in America. It is possible, of course, that slang expressions have changed in meaning since the late '20s; nonetheless, Walker's opening sentence could be interpreted as a call to action for anyone attempting to expand the realm of Everetts' musical influence: "Good trip so far and lots of good records (we hope) but who can tell, they may all be punk, but at least we're trying."